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Maven 3 performance: why all the hubbub, bub?

First off let me say that I have never used Maven, and I honestly don’t know much about it. But I do know a lot about build performance and parallel builds, and I love to look at benchmarks, so naturally I was intrigued by this article on Dr. Dobb’s, which includes a comparison of performance between Maven 2 and Maven 3, the latest release; as well as a comparison between serial and parallel builds using the new parallel build feature in Maven 3.

The thing is, the improvement is not very impressive. Sonatype describes Maven 3 as “dramatically faster” than Maven 2, but according to the published benchmarks, Maven 3 shaves a paltry 5-10 seconds off the Maven 2 build time:

Project Maven 2 Maven 3 Improvement
Maven SCM Trunk 3:20 3:15 5s (2.5%)
“Corporate” 1:04 0:54 10s (15%)

The parallel build feature does better, executing the benchmark builds 1.35x faster (a 25% reduction in build time):

Project Serial Parallel (4 threads) Improvement
Maven SCM trunk 3:15 2:26 49s (25%)
“Corporate” 0:54 0:40 14s (25%)

That’s nothing to scoff at, I suppose, but consider that to obtain that 1.35x speedup, they used 4 threads of parallel execution — that’s the equivalent of make -j 4. With 4 threads of parallel execution you’ll see a 4x speedup, ideally. The benchmark builds here are small, so they are probably dominated by a few large jobs, but even so, with 4 threads you ought to be able to get at least a 2x speedup. For making the jump from serial to 4-way parallel builds, a 1.35x improvement is pretty disappointing.

At first I thought perhaps the author rushed when putting together the Dr. Dobb’s article, and just made a poor choice of benchmarks. But in fact the same benchmarks have been used in a Sonatype blog months before the Dr. Dobb’s article, and apparently in a Jfokus 2011 presentation by Dennis Lundberg.

Where’s the beef?

So what am I missing here? It seems there are only two possibilities:

  1. The performance improvements between Maven 2 and Maven 3 are actually impressive in some cases, and the Maven developers just couldn’t be bothered, over a period of several months, to find more compelling benchmarks; or
  2. The performance improvements between Maven 2 and Maven 3 are just not that impressive, and the published benchmarks are, sadly, representative of the best Maven 3 has to offer at this time.

I know where my money is on that bet.

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